Anzac Legacy Gallery opens in Queensland

A $16 million exhibition that pays tribute to Queenslanders who served in the First World War has opened just in time for the Armistice Centenary.

Tomorrow marks 100 years since the guns of the Western Front fell silent, and along with services across the state, Queenslanders will be able to check out over 50 objects on display at the Queensland Museum in the new Anzac Legacy Gallery.

The exhibition’s centrepiece, a A7V Sturmpanzerwagen known as Mephisto, was recovered from an area close to Villers-Bretonneux, in northern France, called Monument Wood by Queensland soldiers.

They dragged the abandoned tank back to allied lines and it was sent to Australia as a war trophy, arriving at Norman Wharf in 1919.

The exhibition's centrepiece, a A7V Sturmpanzerwagen known as Mephisto, was recovered from an area close to Villers-Bretonneux by Queensland soldiers.

The exhibition’s centrepiece, a A7V Sturmpanzerwagen known as Mephisto, was recovered from an area close to Villers-Bretonneux by Queensland soldiers. (9NEWS)
The exhibition also houses accolades like the Victorian Cross posthumously awarded to Private Patrick Budgden.
The exhibition also houses accolades like the Victorian Cross posthumously awarded to Private Patrick Budgden. (9NEWS)

It is the sole surviving A7V tank in the world.

The exhibition also houses accolades like the Victorian Cross, posthumously awarded to Private Patrick Budgden.

“Paddy” was killed in action in 1917 aged just 20. His family donated the medal to the exhibition.

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